In my dream society….

In my dream society, all members have a voice. Everyone has a space to share their opinions, thoughts and feelings. Freedom of speech is the essence of the place I’d like to inhabit. In most ways, this is in place in the world I inhabit. However, the difference between my dream world and reality is that everyone has the ability to understand the power of their voice. Not just in the content, but in the vocal mechanism itself.

Through teaching for the last ten years, it has become apparent to me, that most people think that individuals are gifted with a beautiful speaking voice. A voice that eases into their listener’s ears and transports us with their stories, awakens us with their ideas and moves us with their view. Maybe some people are lucky to have been born with this skill. However I believe that everyone can unleash this marvellous power and use their voice to their full potential, if they are shown how.

In my dream society this is something we would teach to children as part of mainstream schooling, so as adults they contribute to society confidently and freely. In the world we inhabit, children may access this through extra curricular activities. Those who practice the creative and expressive arts are more likely to have confidence in their voice.

As adults in the society we live in, we can feel the divide between those who have accessed this and those who have not. However we perceive it as raw, unlearnable talent. This is it not the case, a clear, confident, authentic voice is available to us all, if we choose to engage with training that explores and deepens our understanding.

In learning these things, we free our voice. In freeing our voice, we share our ideas. In sharing our ideas, we evolve and grow our communities.

My dream society isn’t as unattainable as perhaps it first seems. Maybe yours isn’t either.

Too Many Choices…..

That’s what she said.

Too many choices.

That’s the problem for us women today,

We just have too many choices.

Too many choices.

Like the idea that all the infinite possibilities that women could pursue

is  whittled down to the same principle of picking your dinner.

Too many choices.

When you go to a one of those big pub chains and you unfold the double sided 5 paged and your like I don’t know what to have there are just too many choices

That’s just the way that women feel.

Me.

I’m a woman.

That I don’t know whether to have the lasagna or the salad.

and I’ll spend ages thinking about it

and the waitress comes over

and I ask for more time.

And lasagna or salad

lasagna or salad

salad and lasagna?????

And just when I’m convinced the choice is whittled down to two and I’m just about to leap off  and commit to one

I see it.

The Mexican section.

And its there and I think what ever was i thinking going for lasagna when i could have an enchilada

or a burrito

or a fajita?

Then I think well aren’t these things all the same thing?

Just wraps in different varieties?

And they have a whole section on wraps.

And I love wraps.

They are all there.

Duck in Hoisin Sauce with iceberg lettuce and cucumber

Southern fried chicken with BBQ sauce

(less bothered about this one)

Chicken, bacon and tomato.

And Oh Mer Gerd!

They have goats cheese. With beetroot and carrot and baby spinach.

That does sound great.

Yep really good.

Like well tasty.

I mean it is a bit of a risk.

having something with that little ‘v’ next to it in a pub that could probably fund its own abatoir with the high levels of meat on this menu.

but no this is good.

great actually.

yep and I’m sure that’s what I’m going to say as the waitress comes over but when she says

what would you like?

It just happens

the words just fall out of my mouth

and I say a cheese burger in a brioche bun with onion rings and side salad and skin on fries.

That. That there.

That is just like the problem for us women today.

Too Many Choices.

A to Z Voice: M is for Mindset.

I was thinking I would be logical and deliver this series of blogs alphabetically but it actually turns out that my creative brain won’t beat to the drum of alphabetical order!

Here I am, jumping in at the letter M! In one to one coaching I am always finding that people’s opinion of their own voices is actually a bit of a barrier when it comes to working on their voice.

Your voice is a deeply personal vessel, that centres you and connects you to the world around you. Maybe someone has made comment on you voice previously or you feel you struggle to be heard? Maybe you really don’t like the sound of your own voice? Maybe some people’s voices are better then others.

This last idea is a common thought. A good speaking voice is a natural talent. Some people are just talented. It makes me think of the Iceberg analogy of only seeing what’s above the surface….

img_7504

I don’t believe that a strong speaking voice is a birth right belonging to a lucky and articulate few. Like anybody can sing, anybody can find authenticity, connectivity and confidence in their voice.

However the first step on the journey to finding your voice is most likely a case of changing how you view your voice. Dr Carol Dweck, psychologist, coined the terms ‘growth’ mindset and ‘fixed’ mindset. It looks like this:

img_7503

This principle is obviously applicable to more then just your relationship to your voice, it’s to do with your outlook on yourself and the world. Growth Mindset is simple, accessible and possible for all. We just have to put it in to practice.

Book List for Really Little Kids 0-2

We consume books at a fast rate in our house and the titles below are well and truly tested on our two children. The eldest is an avid reader and has always liked sitting with book or youngest happy if there is nothing else to do, but would rather explore turning pages as suppose to looking at pictures. The books that made the list, had both of them gripped and are the ones that often get requested to be read that don’t make us Adults feel bored.

Me – Emma Dodd

This is a beautiful book and I love the simple designs and the simple words. Emma Dodd has an amazing ability to create  depth and feelings that communicate the love between parent and child. It’s the perfect gift for new parents who are feeling overwhelmed by the never ending demands of a small person

 Rosie’s Walk – Pat Hutchins

Words are few and tell a simple story, the pictures however tell something quite different. first published in 1968 and filled with yellow, oranges and browns, this book tells us that good illustration can make a book timeless

Each Peach Pear Plum – Janet & Alan Ahlberg

A simple story in verse that has lots go things to hunt for in the pictures. With all the different characters from famous fairy tales and nurses rhymes featured, this is a great book for triggering other stories and songs.

Oi Frog! -Kes Gray & Jim Field

This book is a great one for silly voices and having fun with language. As a voice teacher,it appeals in the same way that Fox in Socks does for older children.

The Lion Inside -Rachel Bright & Jim Field

My parents gave this book to out youngest for Christmas, I love the message behind bandits great for talking about being brave and scared.

Grrrrrr – Rob Biddulph

Really nice for expelling competition and playing fair. Also for underlining that success isn’t everything.

Oh No, George – Chris Haughton

George is a dog who keeps getting into trouble. A great read for consequences of action and perfect for you little one who loves throwing their food on the floor!

What the Ladybird Heard – Julia Donaldson & Lydia Monks

This book has glitter, farm yard animals and a brilliant story! That ticks about every small child box, right?

So those are our favourites. What are yours?

 

Sound

54eb698451151_-_9-things-you-didn-t-know-about-your-ears-mdnSound is a wonderful thing. It fills me up, takes me away, gets my body moving and connects me to others. The spoken voice has the same effect and I love the act of sharing sound. It could stories about your Granny, songs for you children, sounds as you try to loosen your voice and set it free. It could be the first dance at your wedding, the way that you mother said your name when you were caught doing something you shouldn’t or the way that a whole room will start dancing to Whigfield’s Saturday Night.

It could be on the words from your midwife saying ‘it’s a girl!’ or the sound your child makes when saying hello, like a sample it sticks in your head on loop. Sound can be the turn of the key in a lock, in an egnition, in a front door. It could be the smashing of glass, the churning of the washing machine. It could be sssshhs and aaaahhss and ohs and ows and wows. Sound whether I hear it or make it, I feel its vibrations deep in my stomach warming up my body and trickling through me like an outstanding chocolate soufflé.

Sound can swamp us, divide us and conquer us. It can leave us alone and aching for noise to filter through our ears. It can build us up, reach out to love ones and strangers and alert others to dangers. It can be comfort. The sound of the oven timer, bread being lifted out of the oven and turned out onto a cooling rack.

Sound can be the voice of someone telling others what is right and wrong, who is right or wrong or where is right is wrong. Sound can be the sound of water lapping on the side of a rubber dingy as you make your way to a new life. Sound can be the shuffle of papers as you wait nervously for someone to tell you you are allowed to stay. It can be the call to arms, the call to hate, the call of love and propaganda and bird song and waterfalls and the purr of you cat. It can be the slam on your brakes, letting that pheasant quickly escape. Sound can be, can be, can be….

difference-between-sound-waves-and-electromagnetic-waves-image-1The sounds we make and hear have specific memories attached to them. Some of my clients and quite often surprised by the emotional challenges that voice work brings to the surface. I’m not a counsellor, but I am a willing listener and an open ear. I have to be to be a good teacher. Whether you come in the door, looking for accent reduction, better breath support or increased authenticity in the way you speak, a safe and open environment will greet you. Something which is vital for the vulnerability that is often exposed in the lessons.

Today is a new day and we don’t know what sounds await in the future. If you write, keep writing. If you sing, keep singing. Keep dancing, creating and sharing. It can feel so unbelievably futile but it is where we can be vulnerable and share our thoughts. Keep practicing vulnerability and trust that the sounds that come with that as just as valuable and beautiful as anything else.

 

Felicity is a Voice Teacher, Playologist and Story Teller based in South Manchester, UK. To find out more about her work, please visit http://www.felicitygoodman.co.uk

 

Discussing Maternal Health.

A couple of nights ago, I watched Sally Phillips’ documentary – A World Without Downs (http://bbc.in/2cTj02D). It has been ticking over in my mind ever since. On social media it has triggered really interesting and highly emotive debates.

Francis Ryan wrote this article in response to the documentary http://bit.ly/2dBJdQJ, calling on us all to move away from black and white arguments and giving space for the grey. Ryan asks women to stop attacking one and other, “Both women and disabled people deserve better than simplistic judgments”.

I have had two children. They are both under three and I was offered the screening test. I wasn’t really sure what it would tell me. While I am 100% pro choice,  I felt that I would really struggle terminating a pregnancy. However, on reflection I can see that as Ryan points out, that this is black and white reasoning. If I got told that my child would always be in physical pain. It might stop me and make me think. If I got told that my child would be violent. I’m not sure. If I got told my child had a some learning difficulties, then I would not choose to terminate the pregnancy.

The big thing, I gleam from this, is that it is incredibly complex to argue about termination and I am not armed with enough information. So all I have is my opinion. And what’s that worth – well nothing or everything or something, depending on your relationship with me.

There are plenty of keyboard warriors out there who will tell you what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’. Becoming a mother myself, made me see how brutal the online community can be about parenting.

When I was 36 weeks pregnant, with my second daughter, I got diagnosed with Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). ICP stops biles flowing through your liver, as a result these biles build up in your body. The way it manifests is that you get itching on your hands and feet. It turns our that this isn’t entirely true. I had a very itchy stomach and back. I just assumed it was my skin being stretched that was making me uncomfortable. I had already been told that this baby was expected to be a big one (she was average) and that I had too much amniotic fluid (I didn’t in the end). So there I am itching away thinking ‘Oh my big baby, in my olympic size swimming pool of a uterus, is just stretching my skin to the point of near transparency’. I very casually said I had been feeling itchy to my midwife. I nearly didn’t say this. The midwife said it would probably come to nothing, but she ought to run a blood test. Something to do with my liver. It sounded mad. But what did I know! I am not a medical professional. I just was in awe that my liver could be so disgruntled by a baby. I put it down to the many mysteries of pregnancy.

The following morning, I was called by a midwife from the day care unit at the hospital where I was booked in. She said that the blood results weren’t quite right and that I should come in. I asked her when I should come and she told me as soon as possible. Luckily my parents were with us, looking after our eldest, so off we tripped husband and I, trying to stay calm. We knew nothing. We focused on the fact that we would be told if something was wrong and we would be told soon.

Hospitals are strange places. I come from a creative background. The places I work in tend be clear, open spaces. The people I work with are sensitive and responsive to each other. Its quite a tactile environment with a huge amount of peer support. So, to me, Hospitals are strange places. My contact with Hospitals was mainly to see dying relatives. I’m sure I’m not alone in this at all. Hospitals are scary and you hope that you never have to go to them. For yourself or for anyone else. You want to be in good health. When you are pregnant, there is a big rise in how much contact you have with the NHS. With my first pregnancy, all was fine – as expected. I didn’t think of myself as being ill when I went in to hospital.

I’m sure if Hospitals were my working environment, if I saw beds and machinery and uniforms and fluorescent lighting every day, then I would completely normalise it. However, it was normal. I wasn’t normal. Something wasn’t right. I sat in the waiting room, a big ball of nerves. Their was a couple across from us. The woman was silently crying and her partner was trying to comfort her. It was really tense. Another pregnant woman came in and she was on the phone. ‘Yeah, I’ve been here all night. I ran out of battery. They don’t really know what was wrong.’

The room felt close and suffocating despite the big windows behind us. A midwife came in and called my name. She walked us through to a room with two beds in it. Beds probably generous. I would say they were fairly hard rubbery planks. Perfect for a pregnant woman. Any way, as she walked us in she said “So you have obstetric cholestatis, we will hook you up for some monitoring and see how the baby is doing, I’ll be in the office watching the monitor. Let me get you a pillow to make it more comfortable.” She walked out of the room.

My husband and I looked at each other completely baffled. What was this obstetric cholestatis? We could barely say it. Give us a line of Shakespeare and we can crack that code but Obstetric what? When the midwife came back with a pillow, apologising for its thinness, we asked her what it was?

‘Oh Obstetric Cholestatis?’ She said. ‘Its when your liver isn’t quite working properly so you bile levels build up.’

‘Oh.’ I said.

She sat down on the bed by my feet. ‘I’m so sorry. I thought you had been told already that you had it. We are not entirely sure why women get Cholestatis. We think it may be something that occurs when there is a rise in Oestrogen and Progesterone levels in the body. It can be genetic. It disappears again once the baby is born.’

‘Oh.’ I said. It sounded medieval. Even older then that. Like something we would have studied in the history of medicine at school. It seemed mysterious, like another pregnancy thing that no one quite knows why – but Hey! Every pregnancy is different.’So why is the baby being monitored?’ I asked.

‘Well. We just want to make sure that the baby is doing O.K. Are you getting lots of movements?’

I nodded.

‘Then I am sure they are fine.’

‘Why wouldn’t they be fine?’ my husband asked.

‘There is a small risk of sudden stillbirth with this condition. Its a very small risk.’ She went on. I’m sure she said more things, but I had stopped listening. Did she just say stillbirth? This baby could die, suddenly because I was itchy and my liver wasn’t doing its job? There would be no warning. There would be no build up. The baby would just stop. Cease. Be no more. What? You want to monitor the baby to see if its still alive? Down in her underwater world, my daughter gave me a hefty kick in the ribs. Reminding me that she was still there. Still breathing and active.

The midwife wrapped the two bands, pink and blue around my expansive bump and hooked me up to the monitors. We heard her little heart thumping and thumping. She’s alive, she’s fine, she’s safe. But was she? My body was not responding well to her being there and it could kill her. Suddenly. How could my body let me down in this way? How could my body let her down in this way. I spent 36 weeks building her piece by piece, watching my body swell, felt that grind in my pelvis and my hips opened up, adjusting the way I walked as she grew, stopped eating the things I loved, I’d seen her heart beating on scans and I had had many due to worrying speedy growth. I’d made my piece with that. She was a strong, bigger baby who wriggled and wriggled around. I’d explained to my toddler that she would soon have a younger brother or sister. My toddler had felt her kick and move around in my stomach and now? Now all that could change. Just because I was itching?

Was I informed that itching could be a serious problem in pregnancy? No. Was I informed what the blood test was for? No, not exactly. Was I told what was wrong with me, clearly and concisely, without me asking? No. Was I told about the risk to my unborn baby’s health without me asking? No. So how could I make good informed decisions if I wasn’t informed. I had to fall back on my own initiative and understanding to get these answers. There is a lot of enigma surrounding maternal health and its unacceptable that women are not armed with the information about their own bodies. During pregnancy, we can access apps that tell us the size our babies are. But what about the science behind it all? What physiology is being shifted in our bodies? Why are we so uneducated in a process that women have done since time immemorial?

Phillips’ documentary might not have all the answers, or in fact any of them, but there is a lot of knowledge that could be shared with women, that is not. She has been criticised for being too emotionally led and too one sided to give the topic of screening for down syndrome a proper hearing. However, most people experience life emotionally. Historically, thats how we all learned about the important things in life, through the act of one person sharing a story with others. Admittedly, we have made huge advancements in Scientific research since the days that we would share information through the means of storytelling. However, we do not need to dismiss one method in lieu of the other. These things should be compatible.

These issues are very hard to discuss openly and non judgementally because we are not armed with the knowledge or the language to talk about maternal health or disability enough. We will never acquire this language if we never approach these subjects. We will never recognise that these issues need approaching, if we never give them the platform to be discussed. That is what Phillips has started. A discussion. And for that, I am grateful. Let’s hope it leads us to a shift in how we can talk about our experiences in a way to empower both ourselves and others.

Felicity Goodman is a Voice Teacher, Playologist and Story teller based in South Manchester. To learn more about her work, please visit http://www.felicitygoodman.co.uk or say hello on Twitter, @flickgoodman.

Nerves and Public Speaking

Your mouth goes dry. Your legs start to shake. The butterflies are fluttering in your stomach. It’s today. In ten minutes, you are going to stand up in a room full of 25 colleagues and give the report and findings of the last 6 months of work. Your boss is there. Her boss is there and his boss is there too. All the nights you’ve worked late, missing drinks with friends or skipping bedtime stories with your children. The extra work at weekends missing birthdays and barbecues, it all culminates in this 15 minute presentation. What if people don’t listen? What if I sound really boring? What if i go really high pitch or forget what I’m saying? What if my voice let’s me down?

These are common thoughts and feelings that nearly everyone has before they stand up to speak in public. Usually publicly speaking is a reserve or when the odds are quite high. Making a sale, feeding back to a board or making a speech at a Wedding. They are moments when we want to feel most connected to ourselves and our audiences. These are moments when we want to feel authentic and accessible. The pressure we put on ourselves to deliver a ground breaking speech worthy of an Oscar is incredibly high and often understandable.

Here are a few ideas to help you combat those nerves and feel ready to connect.

1. Breath. Breath. Breath and Breath again.

Those butterflies are more then just strange fluttering feelings. Those knots in your stomach are directly effecting your muscles that control your breath. Your diaphragm needs to be able to drop down into your torso like a parachute filling with air or a jellyfish moving through water. If you are finding that your stomach feels tight and uncomfortable or uneasy, the just take a few minutes to focus on your breath and think of it filling your body from the ground up.

2. Find your feet.

What are you feet doing? Are they providing a secure platform on which your body can rest upon? Are you rocking through your feet in an agitated manner? Or are you putting all your weight back into your heels?

Take a breath. Close your eyes if you can or it helps. Imagine you are stood on a sandy beach in barefoot. The sand is warm and golden and dry. It shifts to accommodate a footprint of each of your feet. Your toes, the balls of each foot , through the arches and back through the heel. Feel the sand supporting your weight and giving your foot as much contact with the ground as possible.

3. How am I stood?

Are you stood with your shoulders hunched forward. Are your legs as close far apart? Are your buttocks clenched? Are you tensing your jaw? Are you locking your knees?

Take a breath. Bring your feet to hip width apart, your knees soft. Imaging your have a light travelling all the way up your spine from your tailbone to your head. As the light passes through each vertebra, it creates warm pockets of light and space in between each one. From the tailbone, to the small of the back, up through the arch to the middle of the back. Up in between the shoulder blades, into the neck, head and beyond. Feel your shoulders and your buttocks gently letting go and dropping down the back of your body. Imagine the light travelling through your jaw creating space between your teeth.

4. Mind the the lips, the teeth, the tip of the tongue, the tip of the tongue, the teeth, the lips.

Some students  tell me they quite often trip over their words or under up feeling that they are rushing and enunciating badly. A good way to combat this is to look to give yourself time to warm up before a presentation. It could be your car on they way to work, or before you leave the house or in a quiet corner of your building. Tongue twisters are an excellent tool for getting you mouth and teeth moving. Tip is to not rush them and do lots of different ones. Take the time to really get your moth around the words. These exercises also help to move the sound forward to the front of the mouth. Try this one:

What a to-do to die today, at a minute or two to two;
A thing distinctly hard to say, but harder still to do.
For they’ll beat a tattoo, at twenty to two,
A rat-tat-tat- tat-tat-tat- tat-tat-tattoo.
And a dragon will come when he hears the drum,
At a minute or two to two today, at a minute or two to two.

5. Breath. Again. Seriously.

I believe the number one tool to combatting nerves is to observe the breath. You will breath in and out until your die. Its a reliable mechanism and if you cultivate a positive mental attitude towards your breath it will support you back. Your breath needs space and respect to flourish. If your suck and out the in breath, the muscles which should support your stomach will be neglected or overworked. if you push the air out to hard, you’ll find that you run out of steam quickly and will suffer fatigue and vocal clumsiness.

Take your time. Observe the flow of breath in and out of your body. Only speak when you feel comfortable and assured by the certainty of breath.

 

Follow the link below to hear comedienne Jo Brand talk through dealing with nerves.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/speaker/improve/fear/

Felicity Goodman is a Voice Teacher, Writer and Theatre maker based in Manchester. Please contact her if you interested in Vocal Training or collaborating. To learn more about the work she does, please visit www.felicitygoodman.co.uk

 

Girls -The Process

When I did P.E. in school it was a requirement that we all had to shower post exercise. I’m pretty sure that we were not the only group of school girls who had to do this. We were fortunate as we had individual cubicles in which to shower in with curtains for a privacy which is more then our male counterparts had! The deal was this:
If you were on your period you were excused from showering. A little ‘P’ was marked next to your name in the register. This is odd looking back, like our periods made us all witches where we would burn if water was thrown on us. Like our periods made us unwashable or informed in some way. (This belongs in a different blog I think.)
The Wizard Of Oz
If you were not on your period, you got down to your knickers and bra, pulled your bra straps off your shoulders and wrapped your towel around you. You would then walk into the shower. Splash some water on your upper body, walk out and then be ticked off as washing. We all did this. Without exception. We weren’t challenged to shower properly, even though it must have been really obvious to the female staff that checked us off. After we showered we dosed ourselves with Charlie Red or Impulse.
This was 15 plus years ago, before the internet had really made its mark on us all and certainly before the days of social media. Even then, we were ashamed of our bodies not wanting to reveal them to each other for fear of being found lacking.
Last week I shared this video in response to the Children’s society’s report that revealed that 1 in 3 girls aged between 10 and 14 felt worthless based on their appearance.

It triggered an anger in me that compelled me to write and deliver that piece within a day. How, for all the vast leaps that we have achieved in our culture, are we still sending a message to young girls that how they look is the defining thing about them.

I wanted to place images in the video that were linked to the words being spoken. I decided to type words into google images to use the results. Here are some of the things I discovered….

If you type in Girls you get this page….

girls-google-search

When you type lips:

lips

And so on…

eyes

Typing eyes

And so on…

hair
Typing Hair

And so on….

legs
Typing Legs
Sobering stuff. None of these images are less then what we would class as perfect. These legs are long, smooth, tanned and exact. They don’t represent that majority of the world’s legs, they represent a very particular group of women’s legs. The eyes have all got make up on, as natural as they are being made to look. The lips are also perfectly shaped, have lipstick on them and are mostly fairly seductive. The hair is all thick and voluminous. Its shiny and smooth. I have never seen hair like this on a real person in the flesh in front of me. What’s more concerning is that I didn’t add the prefix of ‘girl’s’ to legs, hair, eyes and lips. Yet all the images that came up are of young women. While I can’t gurantee the ethnicity of all of these models, I think it is fair to say they are predominantly white women.
It is images that are being broadcasted all the time to our young women and girls. When you look at these images they mostly seem like incredibly striking women and its easy to see why we would all like to look like them.
We need to make moves to fight these images and getting these girls more body positive. Schools and communities need to be taking responsibilities and tackling this issue head on. The message being sent out is that if their bodies fit into a certain criteria then they are more desirable. Girls are seeing this and hearing this. Along with the ‘perfect’ bodies that are being projected at them, no wonder their self esteem is worryingly low. Malala Yousafzai puts it well “I raise up my voice—not so I can shout, but so that those without a voice can be heard…we cannot succeed when half of us are held back.”
We, as a society, are holding girls back by placing their value in how they look over what they can achieve.
So what can we do?
1. Compliment a girls character, not her appearance. What’s she good at? what’s she overcome recently? What has she been working on? What does she like to read? Take her to things. spend time learning about what she would like to do.
2. Get writing to you M.P asking for it to be compulsory to teach sex education, mental health and body image in every single school. www.writetothem.com is a great inline tool for finding your local MP and writing to them.
3. Limit time on the internet. I spoke to a teacher recently who said that the girls she taught were looking very tired. when she spoke to their parents, they would say ‘She’s up all night on her phone’. Make some rules about where and when to use the phone. Maybe the whole family can implement a system of putting all their phones on charge in the kitchen for the night? Not having devices out at the dinner table? Is your daughter old enough to be using social media? Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Youtube and Instagram say users need to be over 13.  The problem is its pretty impossible for these companies to enforce these rules, and for a parent. We must understand however that when we arm our daughters with a phone or device we are giving them access to a world of information that we might not feel comfortable looking at.
4.Call people out for making jokes or insulting comments at the expense of someone’s appearance. We’ve all heard these off the cuff remarks about the way someone looks and felt the feeling that we should just laugh it off. However we are sending a message out that this behaviour is appropriate at best and at worst, funny.
Felicity Goodman is a Voice Teacher, Writer and Theatre maker based in Manchester. Please contact her if you interested in Vocal Training or collaborating. To learn more about the work she does, please visit www.felicitygoodman.co.uk

Women Speaking with Authority

Last week, Women’s hour had a section on women undergoing vocal coaching. Addressing the issue head on presenter Emma Barnett talks about how women ‘can face deeply held cultural prejudices about the tone and depth of their voice, reducing their ability to have authority’.

First of all, I think it is important to underline that your voice is incredibly unique and it tells the listener the story of your identity. Any work that looks at ‘changing’ the way you speak should be done sensitively. Your voice can be put through training where the power of the vocal identity carries you through and above any bad habits that you pick up along the way. Bad habits that we all have.

A good starting point to find strength in your voice, is believing you have strength in your voice.

Easier said then done. I recognise that saying this sentence is a bit like saying that ‘chocolate cake is bad for me and I shouldn’t eat it’, as though that is enough to stop you eating it. However with discipline and believing that you have a choice about how you view yourself, a healthy start to exploring your vocal identity is possible.
It can be incredibly hard to believe in what you’re saying if you are worried about how your voice is being received. It undermines any sense of clarity and conviction. Nerves are tricky things and can make our bodies do strange things. Butterflies in the stomach soon lead to a lack of breath support which, in turn, leads to being unable to send enough oxygen to the brain in order to deliver your thoughts into speech.

What if you walked into the next business meeting or presentation, utterly sound in the belief that you not only have a right to be heard, but that people want to hear what you are saying?

Engaging with voice training, will no doubt improve an individual’s vocal quality. However changing the status quo on who should speak and how they should speak is something we all have to take a collective responsibility for.

Now, where is that chocolate cake?

(1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07lfkj5?ns_mchannel=social&ns_campaign=bbc_radio_4&ns_source=twitter&ns_linkname=radio_and_music

Felicity Goodman is a Voice Teacher based in Manchester. Please contact her if you interested in Vocal Training. To learn more about the work she does, please visit www.felicitygoodman.co.uk